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ADD/ADHD

ADHD: What You’re Seeing in Your Grade-Schooler

By Amanda Morin

317Found this helpful

Between kindergarten and fifth grade, your child is tackling a lot of new responsibilities at home and at school. Signs of ADHD may become more evident as demands on your child grow. The following symptoms are typical of ADHD. But keep in mind that they could signal other issues, including sensory processing issues or anxiety.

317Found this helpful
ADHD: What You’re Seeing in Your Grade-Schooler

Grade school usually brings new responsibilities—at home and at school. Signs of ADHD can become more apparent at this time. Here’s what you might see.

Never Seems to Finish Anything
At home: Your child starts putting toys away but abandons the job to see why the dog is barking.
At school: Your child has the academic skills to answer all the test questions, but leaves some of them blank.
The issue: Kids with ADHD can be easily distracted by noises, sights and their own thoughts.

Needs to Constantly Talk
At home: Your child argues and pesters for something long after you’ve said no.
At school: Your child cuts to the front of the line and insists on being first.
The issue: Kids with ADHD often have trouble waiting for or giving up on what they want.
Has to Have Things Now
At home: Your child interrupts while you’re on the phone or takes forever to tell a story.
At school: Your child gets in trouble for talking when he’s not supposed to.
The issue: Kids with ADHD often talk excessively and without filtering what they say.
Appears to Be Daydreaming
At home: Your child asks “what?” a lot when you’re talking to him.
At school: Your child can’t remember the teacher’s directions.
The issue: Kids with ADHD often have trouble paying attention and retaining information.

For more tips and resources, go to understood.org
Graphic of ADHD: What you're seeing in your grade-schooler
Graphic of ADHD: What you're seeing in your grade-schooler

About the Author

Portrait of Amanda Morin

Amanda Morin

A parent advocate and former teacher, Amanda Morin is the proud mom of kids with learning and attention issues and the author of The Everything Parent’s Guide to Special Education.

More by this author

Reviewed by Bob Cunningham, M.A., Ed.M. Dec 04, 2013 Dec 04, 2013

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