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Auditory processing disorder

Auditory Processing Disorder: What You’re Seeing in Your Grade-Schooler

By The Understood Team

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Signs of auditory processing disorder (APD) can easily sneak by in preschool. They may become more noticeable in elementary school. This is when students have to follow more instructions and recognize slight differences in how words sound. Here are some signs of APD in grade-schoolers.

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Auditory Processing Disorder: What You’re Seeing in Your Grade-Schooler

Grade-schoolers with auditory processing disorder (APD) may struggle to separate important sounds from background noise. They may also have a hard time with reading and remembering. Here’s what you might see.

Can’t Stand the Noise
At home: Your child won’t let anyone talk—even quietly—when the TV is on.
At school: Your child has difficulty working in groups because too many kids in the room are talking.
The issue: APD can make it hard to pay attention if there’s background noise.
Isn’t Interested in Books
At home: Your child won’t read out loud to you.
At school: Your child dreads reading and sounding out unfamiliar words in front of classmates.
The issue: Kids with APD often struggle to understand how different sounds work together to form words.
Keeps Forgetting Things
At home: Your child doesn’t remember people’s names.
At school: Your child can’t remember basic math facts and may forget instructions.
The issue: Kids with APD might find it difficult to recall information they’ve heard.
Has Poor Conversation Skills
At home: Your child has trouble expressing emotions.
At school: Your child has a lot of difficulty answering questions and discussing ideas.
The issue: Kids with APD often struggle with oral communication.
Graphic of Auditory processing disorder: What you're seeing in your grade-schooler
Graphic of Auditory processing disorder: What you're seeing in your grade-schooler

About the Author

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The Understood Team

The Understood team is composed of passionate writers, editors and community moderators, many of whom have children with learning and attention issues.

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Reviewed by Ellen Koslo, Au.D. Dec 11, 2013 Dec 11, 2013

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