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Auditory processing disorder

Auditory Processing Disorder: What You’re Seeing in Your Middle-Schooler

By The Understood Team

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Middle school is challenging for many kids. But kids with auditory processing disorder (APD) can struggle even more as schoolwork and peer pressure intensify. The following symptoms are typical of APD, but may also occur with conditions like ADHD and dyslexia.

436Found this helpful
Auditory Processing Disorder: What You’re Seeing in Your Middle-Schooler
As academic demands increase in middle school, kids with auditory processing disorder (APD) can struggle. Here are some signs of APD you might notice.

Hates Reading
At home: Your child won’t even read the book that every kid in school is obsessed with.
At school: Your child has weak reading comprehension.
The issue: Kids with APD often struggle to develop reading skills. If their brain is working overtime to decode words, they don’t understand the text.
Won’t Follow Directions
At home: No matter what chores you assign, your child only does half of what you ask.
At school: When the teacher tells everyone to “take out your science textbooks, turn to page 45 and read the first two paragraphs,” your child takes out the textbook then stares into space.
The issue: Kids with APD often have trouble following multi-step directions, especially in noisy settings.
Often Doesn’t “Get It”
At home: Your child doesn’t understand riddles and sometimes seems lost in conversations.
At school: Your child needs a lot of repetition to learn new concepts.
The issue: Kids with APD often struggle with tasks that require higher-level listening skills.
Graphic of Auditory Processing Disorder-What You're Seeing in Your Middle-Schooler
Graphic of Auditory Processing Disorder-What You're Seeing in Your Middle-Schooler

About the Author

Understood Team Graphic

The Understood Team

The Understood team is composed of passionate writers, editors and community moderators, many of whom have children with learning and attention issues.

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Reviewed by Joanne Restivo, Au.D. Dec 18, 2013 Dec 18, 2013

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