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Dyspraxia

At a Glance: Different Types of Dyspraxia and the Skills They Affect

By Peg Rosen

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You may hear about many types of dyspraxia (some of which may be called apraxia). Not all are well researched or clearly defined. But four of them often relate to learning and attention issues. They affect things like fine motor skills, gross motor skills, balance, coordination and movement involved with speaking. Learn more about these four types of dyspraxia.

73Found this helpful
At a Glance: Different Types of Dyspraxia and the Skills They Affect

Dyspraxia impacts many skills needed for classroom learning and daily living. The four kinds of dyspraxia below, among others, can appear in kids with learning and attention issues. Read about what they are and the skills they affect.

Ideomotor Dyspraxia
What it means
Child knows “in his head” how to do simple one-step tasks. But he has trouble turning these ideas into actual movements.
Skills it may affect
At home: Brushing hair, using a fork, climbing stairs, pouring juice, gently patting the dog, turning a faucet
At school: Gripping a pencil, using scissors, kicking or throwing a ball, jumping, carrying books without dropping them, waving to friends

Ideational Dyspraxia
What it means
Child has trouble planning and executing the sequences of steps needed for complex tasks.
Skills it may affect
At home: Tying shoes, brushing teeth, getting dressed, making a bed, cooking, cleaning room, riding a bike
At school: Using a combination lock, writing clearly, typing on a computer keyboard, doing labwork in science class, playing sports

Oromotor Dyspraxia
What it means
Child has trouble coordinating the movement of muscles needed to pronounce words. Also called verbal apraxia.
Skills it may affect
At home: Enunciating clearly enough to be understood (even by family members), communicating in public settings like stores, libraries, and restaurants
At school: Fitting in socially because of diffculty communicating or because he “sounds funny,” participating fully in class, communicating with teachers effectively

Constructional Dyspraxia
What it means
Child has trouble understanding spatial relations. This makes it hard to create a “whole” from smaller parts or to place objects according to a pattern.
Skills it may affect
At home: Arranging place settings at a table; copying Lego models; doing puzzles; organizing his room or belongings in the way you ask him to
At school: Participating in art activities and crafts, like making valentines; copying pictures, patterns and diagrams; lining items up in tables and charts; drawing shapes in geometry
Graphic of At a Glance: Different Types of Dyspraxia and the Skills They Affect
Graphic of At a Glance: Different Types of Dyspraxia and the Skills They Affect

About the Author

Portrait of Peg Rosen

Peg Rosen

Peg Rosen has written for numerous digital and print outlets, including ParentCenter, WebMD, Parents, Good Housekeeping, More, Fitness and Martha Stewart.

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Reviewed by Bob Cunningham, M.A., Ed.M. Mar 05, 2015 Mar 05, 2015

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