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Dyspraxia

Dyspraxia: What You’re Seeing in Your Grade-Schooler

By Erica Patino

187Found this helpful

The signs of dyspraxia can become more noticeable in grade school. Children with dyspraxia may struggle to communicate and may find everyday physical activities challenging. Here are some typical symptoms. Keep in mind that these signs may occur with other issues, such as dysgraphia, sensory processing issues or significant developmental delays.

187Found this helpful
Dyspraxia: What You’re Seeing in Your Grade-Schooler

Dyspraxia can aect a number of skills, from speech to coordination and balance. Here are signs to look out for in your grade-schooler.

Doesn’t Pronounce Words Clearly
At home:
Your child’s speech can sound choppy or have a monotone quality to it.
At school:
Your child understands what other kids say but has difficulty expressing his thoughts.
The issue:
Kids with dyspraxia can have trouble coordinating muscle movements in the mouth. Professionals also refer to this as “apraxia.”

Has Problems With Physical Activities

At home:
Your child is clumsy walking up and down stairs.
At school:
Your child still isn’t able to throw or catch a ball.
The issue:
Kids with dyspraxia tend to have weak gross motor skills, or trouble using big muscles in the body.

Writes Poorly
At home:
Your child does homework, especially written assignments, at a very slow pace.
At school:
Your child struggles to complete writing and copying tasks in the allotted time.
The issue:
Kids with dyspraxia can have trouble with fine motor skills, like using the small muscles of the hand for writing.

Seems Awkward
At home:
Your child bumps into things and falls a lot.
At school:
Your child has trouble keeping the rhythm in music class.
The issue:
Kids with dyspraxia can struggle with balance and coordination.
Graphic of Dyspraxia: What you're seeing in your grade-schooler
Graphic of Dyspraxia: What you're seeing in your grade-schooler

About the Author

Portrait of Erica Patino

Erica Patino is an online writer and editor who specializes in health and wellness content.

Reviewed by

Portrait of Sheldon Horowitz

Sheldon H. Horowitz, Ed.D., is senior director of learning resources and research at the National Center for Learning Disabilities.

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