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Sensory processing issues

Sensory Processing Issues: What You’re Seeing in Your Grade-Schooler

By Erica Patino

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Between kindergarten and fifth grade, sensory processing issues may become easier to spot. The following signs are typical of sensory processing issues for children at this stage, but some may also occur with other issues like ADHD or dyspraxia.

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Sensory Processing Issues: What You’re Seeing in Your Grade-Schooler

School work and social interaction ramp up in grade school. Signs of sensory processing issues might become more noticeable during this time. Be on the lookout for situations like these.

Plays Too Rough
At home: Your child grabs a family pet too forcefully or bangs into walls during playtime.
At school: Your child pushes another child too hard in gym class.
The issue: Kids with sensory processing issues may not understand their own strength. They can also have trouble reading cues from the environment (such as what sorts of things might hurt).

Is Easily Overwhelmed
At home: Your child runs away from visitors or throws new toys to the side.
At school: Your child can’t stand the playground—and might even get angry when it’s time to go outside.
The issue: Children with sensory processing issues can feel overwhelmed by their surroundings. They might react impulsively or throw a tantrum as a result.

Has Difficulty Using His Hands
At home: Your child struggles when using forks and knives or when buttoning a shirt.
At school: Your child doesn’t like drawing and has difficulty with handwriting.
The issue: Kids with sensory processing issues might struggle with motor skills because they don’t like the way objects feel in their hands.

Is Easily Distracted and Fidgety
At home: While watching TV, your child can’t find a comfortable position. He moves around a lot as a result.
At school: Your child won’t stay at his desk and frequently gets up to walk around.
The issue: Kids with sensory processing issues can be very sensitive to their environment. They might constantly move around to find just the right position.
Graphic of Sensory processing issues: What you're seeing in your grade schooler
Graphic of Sensory processing issues: What you're seeing in your grade schooler

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About the Author

Portrait of Erica Patino

Erica Patino

Erica Patino is an online writer and editor who specializes in health and wellness content.

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Reviewed by Sheldon H. Horowitz, Ed.D. Feb 13, 2014 Feb 13, 2014

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