Skip to content

Dyscalculia in High School: 4 Signs You Might See

By Amanda Morin

In high school, you may start noticing dyscalculia outside of math class, especially if your teen is learning to drive. Here are four signs of dyscalculia you might see in high school.

1. Freezing When Asked Math-Related Questions

Kids with dyscalculia tend to have a hard time with basic math facts and doing mental math. Your child may come home after picking up milk at one store and something else at another, and have trouble telling you the total cost. Or your child might need to use a calculator to answer a basic multiplication problem.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Please wait…

By signing up, you acknowledge that you reside in the United States and are at least 13 years old, and agree that you’ve read the Terms and Conditions. Understood.org does not market to or offer services to individuals in the European Union.

2. Always Running Late

Keeping track of time and sticking to a schedule can be hard for kids with dyscalculia. Your child may miss important events and may have trouble getting home in time. At school your child might often be late for class and even go into the wrong classroom.

3. Trouble Sticking to a Budget

Kids with dyscalculia can have trouble estimating how much things cost. Your child might wildly overestimate how many groceries can be bought with $15. Kids who get an allowance might use it all right away and be confused about why there’s not enough left to buy more.

4. Moving Too Fast or Too Slow

Judging speed and distance can be tough for kids with dyscalculia. Your child may get behind the wheel and zoom past or lag behind other cars on the road. At track practice, your child sprints through the first lap when running a mile—but is exhausted by the second lap.

Share

Share Dyscalculia in High School: 4 Signs You Might See

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Email
  • Text Message
  • Coming soonGoogle Classroom

Share Dyscalculia in High School: 4 Signs You Might See

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Email
  • Text Message
  • Coming soonGoogle Classroom