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When Kids Won’t Talk About the Coronavirus: What to Do

By The Understood Team on

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When kids are worried or afraid, they don’t always want to talk about it. For kids who learn and think differently, there can be added challenges that keep them from opening up.

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For example, kids who struggle with language may have a hard time expressing their feelings. Those who have trouble with executive function may be unrealistic and believe ignoring the topic will make it go away. And kids with slow processing speed may need more time to take in the information and process it.

If your child doesn’t want to talk about the coronavirus, it’s important to respect that and not push.

“Kids open up when they’re ready, not when you try to force conversations,” says Bob Cunningham, executive director of learning development at Understood. “They’re more likely to shut down further if you pressure them into a conversation that they’re not ready to have.”

Instead, just say you’re happy to talk or answer questions any time your child wants to.

Explore more coronavirus updates and tips from Understood.

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  • Facebook
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  • Coming soonGoogle Classroom