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Leaving high school

At a Glance: Housing Options for Young Adults With Learning Disabilities

By Victoria Scanlan Stefanakos

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Learning and attention issues can be an important factor when deciding where to live after high school. There are resources you can use if you’re concerned your child may not have the skills needed to live independently.

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At a Glance: Housing Options for Young Adults With Learning Disabilities

Some young adults with learning and attention issues might not be ready to live on their own. Here are some housing options to consider if your child needs more support or training for independent living.

Living at Home
Many young adults live at home for a while after high school. You can use this time to teach him life skills such as shopping and money management. If you think he will be living with you long-term, look for ways to give him more autonomy. Modifying your living space can help him begin the transition to adulthood while keeping his connection to familiar surroundings.

Transitional Programs
One way to see if your child is ready for independent living is to sign up for a transitional program. It allows young adults to live away from home for three months or longer while learning life skills. Find information about these residential programs at Parent Training and Information Centers (PTIs) and at fairs for special needs camps.

Supported Living
Does your child need help handling some of the responsibilities of adulthood? Supported living offers a broad spectrum of services. For example, your child could live alone but have someone come in to supervise daily living skills. This could include anything from cooking to using the Internet. Programs are offered through cities and towns, through high school and community college partnerships and through private companies.

Group Homes With Services
If you think your child will need ongoing assistance, you may want to look into group homes for young adults. Usually, a service provider owns and staffs the home where six or eight residents live together. Group home living promotes increased independence, provides a social group and is usually designed for people with similar challenges. Staff members teach daily living and self-help skills. You can find information about these programs through disability.gov.
Graphic of At a glance: Housing options for young adults with learning disabilities
Graphic of At a glance: Housing options for young adults with learning disabilities

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About the Author

Portrait of Victoria Scanlan Stefanakos

Victoria Scanlan Stefanakos

Victoria Scanlan Stefanakos is a writer and editor for many national publications.

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Reviewed by Jim Rein, M.A. Jun 27, 2014 Jun 27, 2014

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