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Dyspraxia

6 Ways Dyspraxia Can Affect Your Child’s Social Life

By Erica Patino

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Dyspraxia can affect the way your child relates to family, teachers and classmates. Below you’ll find six ways that kids with dyspraxia may struggle with social skills—and the reasons behind this.

169Found this helpful
6 Ways Dyspraxia Can Affect Your Child’s Social Life

Some of the symptoms of dyspraxia can make it hard for kids to fit in with their peers. Here’s what you may be seeing.

Dislikes Playing Sports With Other Kids

At home:
Your child is uninterested (or even fearful) when it comes to throwing and catching a ball, tossing a Frisbee or playing with puzzles.

At school:
Your child dislikes gym class and tends to stand off to the side rather than engage with peers.

The issue:
Kids with dyspraxia can have difficulty with physical activities requiring coordinated movements, hand strength and balance.

Seems Disorganized

At home:
Your child has a hard time following directions.

At school:
Your child fails to bring the right books and assignments to class.

The issue:
Kids with dyspraxia can struggle with paying attention—to the point of being mistakenly thought to have ADHD.

Is Difficult to Understand

At home:
Your child sometimes drops off sounds in words when speaking with you.

At school:
Your child understands what the teacher is saying but has a hard time verbalizing answers to questions.

The issue:
Kids with verbal dyspraxia may struggle with producing sounds and putting their thoughts into words.

Seems Immature

At home:
Your child needs help with skills like dressing, personal grooming or cutting foods.

At school:
Your child has trouble following basic classroom routines, like packing a backpack.

The issue:
Kids with dyspraxia might lag behind when it comes to developing important life skills.

Speaks Awkwardly

At home:
Your child uses an inappropriate tone of voice at dinnertime.

At school:
Your child has trouble modulating volume of speech—it’s too loud or too soft—in various classroom scenarios.

The issue:
Kids with dyspraxia may have trouble controlling the volume and pitch of their voice. They might be made fun of by peers as a result.

Is Often Anxious

At home:
Your child tends to be fearful or overly cautious in new or unfamiliar settings.

At school:
Your child avoids casual conversations for fear of saying something embarrassing.

The issue:
Kids with dyspraxia can seem overly anxious or worried, especially when they have to make quick decisions.
Graphic of 6 ways dyspraxia can affect your child's social life
Graphic of 6 ways dyspraxia can affect your child's social life

About the Author

Portrait of Erica Patino

Erica Patino

Erica Patino is an online writer and editor who specializes in health and wellness content.

More by this author

Reviewed by Sheldon H. Horowitz, Ed.D. Dec 16, 2013 Dec 16, 2013

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