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Finding an assistive technology

8 New Apps for Tweens and Teens With Learning and Attention Issues

By Common Sense Media, Understood Founding Partner

93Found this helpful

A well-chosen app can boost your child’s learning or help her with a specific challenge. Here are eight new and recently updated apps for tweens and teens with learning and attention issues. Keep in mind that new apps are often released for iOS first, but they may become available for Android at a later date. You can use Tech Finder to find more age-specific apps.

Price and availability may vary but were accurate at the time of publication, on December 9, 2016. Understood does not endorse or receive financial compensation for the sale of any of these products.

93Found this helpful
Algebra Touch
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Algebra Touch

Algebra Touch helps kids learn algebra in a visual and tactile way. Kids drag variables and numbers to rearrange them. They tap the screen to simplify expressions, and draw lines to delete identical terms. The app starts with the basics. It then moves to more difficult problems, building on kids’ understanding.

Issues: Math

Price: $2.99

Available for: Android, iOS

LikeSo
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LikeSo

LikeSo analyzes kids’ speech to see if they use common filler words, such as “like,” “so” or “you know.” Kids select a topic, and the app gives them written prompts to get them talking. They can also talk about whatever comes to mind. After kids record their speech, the app analyzes the audio and tells kids how many times they used filler words. It also tells kids how fast they’re speaking, in words per minute.

Issues: Spoken language

Price: $0.99

Available for: iOS

Forest
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Forest: Stay Focused, Be Present

Tweens and teens who have trouble putting down digital devices may benefit from Forest. Kids start by clicking into the app to start growing a virtual tree. As the tree grows, the app displays messages like “Put down your phone” and “Leave me alone!” If kids leave their device alone, the tree grows. But if kids exit the app—for instance, to check text messages or social media—the tree dies. Kids can share their “forests” with their friends, which can generate friendly competition around putting down the phone.

Issues: Attention, hyperactivity, time management

Price: Free for Android, $1.99 for iOS

Available for: Android, iOS

Ghotit Dyslexia Keyboard
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Ghotit Dyslexia Keyboard

Ghotit Dyslexia Keyboard is an on-screen keyboard to help kids with writing issues. The app offers a number of assistive technology tools for reading and writing, including text-to-speech, word prediction, spell-check and proofreading tools. Your child must have access to an iPad with iOS 10 installed to use this app.

Issues: Reading, writing

Price: $19.99

Available for: iPad

Sit With Us
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Sit With Us

Sit With Us is a social media app that encourages kids to sit together for meals, so no child has to sit alone at lunchtime. The app was created by a high school student who felt rejected after sitting alone during lunch in middle school. Kids can sign up for the app through Facebook or email. Once signed up, they can search for a lunch table to join. Or they can invite others to sit with them. Sit With Us is most helpful if other kids at your child’s school use the app, too.

Issues: Social skills

Price: Free

Available for: iOS

Amazon Rapids
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Amazon Rapids

Amazon Rapids gives kids access to a library of original short stories told through simple dialogue. The dialogue appears like text messages on the screen, one message at a time. Kids can have the text of the stories read aloud by a computer voice. They can also look up words that they don’t understand. The stories in Amazon Rapids may appeal to kids with reading issues who don’t like long or complex stories. The dialogue in the stories can also be a little edgy, which may help to hold the interest of older kids.

Issues: Reading

Price: $2.99 per month

Available for: Android, iOS

Socratic
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Socratic

Kids can use Socratic to search for answers to homework questions in math, science and other subjects. Kids can take a photo of the question they’re working on with their device, or just type it in. The app searches the Internet for a solution. In many cases, the app will give an exact answer, along with all the steps and work. For more complicated questions, the app may deliver a basic web search or a list of curated expert or crowd-sourced answers. Kids with non-iOS devices can use Wolfram Alpha (as a Chrome tool or Android app) for similar homework support.

Issues: Math

Price: Free

Available for: iOS

Streaks
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Streaks

Streaks helps kids form good habits and track their goals. The app challenges kids to achieve a “streak” of daily actions. Kids do so by performing the action on consecutive days. The app tracks kids’ progress and displays how they’re doing over time. Streaks has many suggested tasks, like walking and eating healthy meals. Kids can add their own tasks, too, like doing homework or talking to a new person each day.

Issues: Organization, planning

Price: $3.99

Available for: iOS

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6 Chrome Tools for Kids With Math Issues

If your child has trouble with math, there’s assistive technology that can help. Here are six Chrome apps and extensions to check out. (Extensions add functions to the Chrome browser.) They can be used on Chromebooks or on any device with a Chrome browser. The best part? They’re all free.

Price and availability may vary but were accurate at the time of publication, on October 3, 2016. Understood does not endorse or receive financial compensation for the sale of any of these products.

6 New Apps for Young Kids With Learning and Attention Issues

Apps are a fun way to help your child learn or manage challenges related to specific learning and attention issues. Here are six new or recently updated apps for young kids. You can use Tech Finder to explore more options for apps depending on your child’s age and challenges.

Price and availability may vary but were accurate at the time of publication, on December 9, 2016. Understood does not endorse or receive financial compensation for the sale of any of these products.

About the Author

Common Sense Media Logo

Common Sense Media, Understood Founding Partner is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping kids and families thrive in a world of media and technology.

Reviewed by

Portrait of Jamie Martin

Jamie Martin is an assistive technology consultant, specializing in finding AT solutions for students and adults with dyslexia.

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