Questions to Ask When Hiring a Tutor

By Amanda Morin

How do you choose a tutor for kids who learn and think differently? Whether you’re looking for a tutor to help your child with dyslexia, dyscalculia, or something else, it’s important to ask the right questions.

Here are questions to ask before you hire a tutor for your child.

  • How long have you been tutoring?
  • What are your qualifications, certifications, or credentials?
  • What’s your expertise in the content area my child is studying?
  • Have you worked before with kids or adults who have trouble with the same skills as my child?
  • How will you get a sense of my child’s needs?
  • What strategies have you found help most when you start to work with a child?
  • Can you tell me a little bit about your teaching philosophy?
  • What kind of results can I expect to see, and what happens if my child doesn’t make progress?
  • What might get in the way of achieving your tutoring goals?
  • How would you help my child deal with [specific challenge your child has had]?
  • What can I do to support the process?
  • How will you communicate with me, and how often?
  • How will you work and communicate with my child’s teachers?
  • How do you measure progress?
  • Do you have references I can speak to?
  • What’s your availability?
  • Where will the tutoring sessions take place?
  • How long is each tutoring session?
  • How much do you charge per session?
  • Are there other fees (for materials or assessments, for example)?
  • What’s your policy for cancellations and make-up sessions?

Learn more about the pros and cons of different tutoring options. You might also be interested in exploring online tutoring services.

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    About the author

    About the author

    Amanda Morin is the director of thought leadership at Understood and author of “The Everything Parent’s Guide to Special Education.” She worked as a classroom teacher and early intervention specialist for more than a decade.

    Reviewed by

    Reviewed by

    Sheldon H. Horowitz, EdD is senior director of learning resources and research at the National Center for Learning Disabilities.