Close
Language?
English
Español
ADD/ADHD

ADHD: What You’re Seeing in Your Middle-Schooler

By Amanda Morin

189Found this helpful

During middle school, signs of ADHD may become clearer as your child faces greater demands at school, at home and in the complex social world of tweens. The following are typical symptoms of ADHD. Some of these can also be seen with other issues, including sensory processing issues and anxiety.

189Found this helpful
ADHD: What You’re Seeing in Your Middle-Schooler

ADHD can create challenges in middle school as kids deal with planning, organization and socializing. Here are signs you may see and what they mean.

Can’t Find Anything
At home: Your child’s room is a mess and nothing’s where it should be.
At school: Your child’s always missing things she needs when she gets to class.
The issue: Kids with ADHD often struggle with organization and planning.

Starts the Job but Doesn’t Finish
At home: Your child starts setting the dinner table but stops after the silverware.
At school: Your child completes one side of the math sheet but ignores the other side.
The issue: Kids with ADHD can have dificulty following through on tasks. They may have the academic skills, but skip questions or make careless errors with spelling or calculations.

Has No Filter
At home: Your child says hurtful and insulting things to siblings or friends.
At school: Your child shares too much personal information with classmates.
The issue: Kids with ADHD might speak without thinking or anticipating the reaction of others.

Can’t Figure Out How to Get Things Done
At home: Your child is supposed to organize the basement but can’t figure out how to do it.
At school: Your child needs to outline a book report but forgets key details about the book.
The issue: Kids with ADHD often struggle with multi-step activities.
Graphic of ADHD: What you're seeing in your middle-schooler
Graphic of ADHD: What you're seeing in your middle-schooler

About the Author

Portrait of Amanda Morin

Amanda Morin is a parent advocate, a former teacher and the author of The Everything Parent’s Guide to Special Education.

Reviewed by

Portrait of Bob Cunningham

Bob Cunningham, Ed.M., serves as advisor-in-residence on learning and attention issues for Understood.

Did you find this helpful?

What’s New on Understood