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Why and How to Partner With Your Child’s Teacher

By Amanda Morin

At a Glance

  • Working with your child’s teacher can have a powerful impact on you, the teacher, and your child.

  • A partnership helps you and the teacher learn more about your child.

  • Engaging the teacher lets you find strategies to help your child at home and in school.

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If you’ve noticed signs in your child that concern or confuse you, talking to the teacher is a good first step. Sharing information can give you a better idea of what’s going on.

But the relationship doesn’t stop there. The teacher is an important partner in getting answers and finding the best ways to help your child thrive. Together you can explore strategies to use in class and at home. And you can talk about other ways to support your child at school.

Learn why it’s important to engage and partner with the teacher, and how to do it.

How Working With the Teacher Helps You and Your Child

You and your child’s teacher share a common goal: Providing the best learning experience for your child.

Working with the teacher can give you an even better understanding of your child. It also gives you the chance to share concerns about what’s happening at home that the teacher may or may not be seeing in school.

For example, the teacher might tell you your child gets frustrated about assignments and says things like “Why do we have to learn this?” Maybe you see the same frustrated reaction when it comes to homework.

By keeping each other informed, you can come up with consistent ways to respond to frustration at home and at school.

Knowing that you’re working together can boost your child’s confidence, too. When you and the teacher have the same expectations and use the same language, it shows your child that everyone’s on the same page.

How Working With You Helps the Teacher

Understanding what your child has trouble with (and your child’s strengths and interests) helps the teacher build an approach to learning that works for your child. It also helps the teacher predict what might be hard and figure out what kind of support would help.

Having that information makes it easier for the teacher to engage your child in learning. For example, say writing is a struggle and the teacher knows your child has a passion for dogs. The teacher could find a way to work something about dogs into a writing assignment.

How to Engage Your Child’s Teacher

Partnering with your child’s teacher starts with an open conversation about your child’s challenges. You don’t need to wait for parent-teacher conferences. Reach out to the teacher as soon as you notice differences or difficulties.

Here are three ways to engage with the teacher to get your child the best support.

  1. Talk about strategies the teacher can use in the classroom. There may be supports or teaching techniques that can help your child.

  2. Talk about having your child evaluated to get formalized support at school. The more you know about the challenges, the better able you and the teacher will be to help.

  3. Bring your child into the process. Make a 3×3 card to share with the teacher: three strengths, three challenges, and three strategies that work at home.

3×3 Card to Help Teachers Get to Know Your Child

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None 3×3 Card to Help Teachers Get to Know Your Child

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Key Takeaways

  • Partnering with your child’s teacher can give your child a confidence boost.

  • Knowing more about their students helps teachers tailor instruction for kids.

  • Talk with the teacher about strategies that could help at school.

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Share Why and How to Partner With Your Child’s Teacher

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Email
  • Text Message
  • Coming soonGoogle Classroom