Close
Language?
English
Español
Instructional strategies

6 Tips for Helping Your Child Improve Reading Comprehension

By Ginny Osewalt

2kFound this helpful
2kFound this helpful

Good readers are active readers. When your child has a hard time understanding what she reads, instruction can help. Here are some strategies to try.

1 of 6

Make connections.

Connecting what your child already knows while she reads sharpens her focus and deepens understanding. Show her how to make connections by sharing your own connections as you read aloud. Maybe the book mentions places you’ve been together on vacation. Talk about your memories of those places. Invite your child to have a turn. Remind your child that good readers make all kinds of connections as they read.

2 of 6

Ask questions.

Asking questions will make your child want to look for clues in the text. Pose questions that will spark your child’s curiosity as you read aloud. Frequently ask her, “What are you wondering?” Jot down those “wonderings” and then see how they turn out. Remind your child that good readers challenge what they’re reading by asking questions.

3 of 6

Create “mind movies.”

Creating visual images brings the text alive. These “mind movies” make the story more memorable. You can help your child do this by reading aloud and describing the pictures you’re seeing in your own imagination. Use all five senses and emotions. Invite your child to share her “mind movies.” Notice how they’re different from yours. You might even ask your child to draw what’s in her imagination.

4 of 6

Make inferences.

We “infer” by combining what we already know with clues from a story. For example, when we read, “Her eyes were red and her nose was runny,” we can infer that she has a cold or allergies. You can help your child with this reading skill by predicting what might happen in the story as you read aloud. Then invite your child to do the same.

5 of 6

Figure out what’s important.

Determining what’s important is central to reading. When you read a story with your child, you might download a “story element” organizer. You can use it to keep track of the main characters, where the story is taking place, and the problem and solution of the story. Nonfiction texts look different from fiction. They’re organized with features like the table of contents, headings, bold print, photos and the index.

6 of 6

Monitor comprehension.

Readers who monitor their own reading use strategies to help them when they don’t understand something. Teach your child how to “click and clunk.” Read together and ask her to hold up one finger when the reading is making sense (click) and two fingers when meaning breaks down (clunk). To repair the “clunks,” use these “fix-up” strategies:

  • Re-read.
  • Read on—now does it make sense?
  • Read out loud.
  • Read more slowly.
  • Look at illustrations.
  • Identify confusing words.

View the tips again

9 Tips for Talking With Your Child’s Teacher About Executive Functioning Issues

When your child has executive functioning issues or ADHD (the impairment of executive functions), it’s important to talk with his teacher. If the teacher knows what your child struggles with and how he learns best, it can have a big impact on how well the school year goes. Here are tips for explaining these issues to teachers.

5 Conversation Starters for Discussing Behavioral Problems With Teachers

It’s never easy to talk about your child’s behavior problems. But the teacher likely has seen the behavior issues before with other kids. Here are conversation starters that will help you understand the problems better.

About the Author

Portrait of Ginny Osewalt

Ginny Osewalt

Ginny Osewalt is dually certified in elementary and special education with 14 years of experience in general education, inclusion, resource room and self-contained settings.

More by this author

Did you find this helpful?

Comments

What’s New on Understood

facebook
twitter
pinterest
googleplus
email