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Math Trouble: Conversation Starters to Use With Your Child’s Teacher

By The Understood Team

At a Glance

  • If your child is struggling with math, talking about it is a good step toward getting answers.

  • Your child’s teacher can help you understand what’s going on and what to do next.

  • Having the words to use can make the conversation easier.

Is your child having trouble with math? Talking with the teacher can help you understand what’s happening and how to help. It’s a conversation you can have in person, like at your parent-teacher conference. Or you can set up another time to talk. (If you can’t meet in person, it’s OK to connect by phone or email.)

But what do you say when you talk with the teacher? How do you express your concerns?

Some parents and caregivers have a hard time talking about their child’s challenges. They may not be comfortable talking to teachers. Or they might feel embarrassed that their child is struggling with math. But teachers can provide information and advice that nobody else can.

When you talk to the teacher, be clear and specific. Ask questions and follow-up questions. The whole point is to find out what’s going on with your child and what can help.

Here are some sample conversation starters to make the talk easier.

Asking to meet or talk: “Hi. I’m Olivia’s father Joe. I’m worried about how she’s doing with math. Can we find time to talk about it?”

Starting the conversation: “Thanks for talking with me. I’m concerned that Olivia is having trouble with math. We practice the addition

and subtraction facts on the sheets she brings home, but she quickly forgets the facts we go over. What do you see when you work with her in class?”

Sharing information: “She also gets upset on days when there’s going to be a math quiz. Sometimes she doesn’t want to go to school. What do you make of that?”

Getting information: “Can you tell me how Olivia’s doing with math overall? Is she keeping up? Is there anything specific she’s having trouble with?”

Following up on answers: “You mentioned she has difficulty with number sense. I’m not sure what that is. Can you give me an example?”

Asking about help: “What can help Olivia with math? Are there things you can do in class? What do you recommend we do at home to help her with math?”

Finishing the conversation: “Thanks for your help. I have a better idea of what’s happening with Olivia and math. Can we talk again after I have a chance to think about this?”

Do you have a parent-teacher conference coming up? Here’s a list of more questions you can ask.

Parent-Teacher Conference Checklist for Math

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Key Takeaways

  • Be clear and specific when you talk to the teacher. Ask questions.

  • Get ideas from the teacher for helping your child at home.

  • Ask for a follow-up conversation after you’ve had time to process the information.

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Share Math Trouble: Conversation Starters to Use With Your Child’s Teacher

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  • Twitter
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  • Email
  • Text Message
  • Coming soonGoogle Classroom

Share Math Trouble: Conversation Starters to Use With Your Child’s Teacher

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Email
  • Text Message
  • Coming soonGoogle Classroom