Distractibility / inattention

The Teacher Says My Daughter Daydreams a Lot. Is My Child Just Bored?

By Rayma Griffin

The teacher says that my daughter daydreams a lot. Could my child just be bored?

Rayma Griffin

Educational Consultant

While your daughter might be bored at times, excessive daydreaming could also be a sign of ADHD. Children with the inattentive type of ADHD can be forgetful or easily distracted. They also tend to get lost in their own thoughts.

ADHD is a common medical condition. But parents and teachers can have a tough time picking up on signs of the inattentive type of ADHD. (This type is sometimes called attention-deficit disorder or ADD.) Adults may not suspect a daydreaming child has attention issues. They might just think she lacks motivation.

Schools may also be less likely to request an evaluation for daydreamers because these kids are often quiet in class. They aren’t disruptive in the way that kids who are hyperactive or impulsive can be. Often kids who have trouble staying focused simply fall through the cracks.

Girls with attention issues are more likely to remain undiagnosed than boys. And for many girls, undiagnosed ADHD can lead to social and emotional problems. That’s because these girls may begin to see themselves as less capable than their peers. That can contribute to low self-esteem, anxiety and depression.

If you’re concerned about your daughter’s daydreaming, talk to her teachers or her doctor. If she does have ADHD, there are many things you can do to work on improving her focus. The sooner she can get the right kind of help, the better chance she has of succeeding academically and socially.

About the Author

Portrait of Rayma Griffin

Rayma Griffin

Rayma Griffin, M.Ed., has spent 40 years working with children with learning and attention issues, both in the classroom and as an administrator.

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