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Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia: What You’re Seeing in Your Middle-Schooler

By Amanda Morin

247Found this helpful

In middle school, your child may start showing more signs of dyscalculia—in math class and when doing everyday activities. Some of these symptoms may also be seen in kids with dyslexia, dyspraxia or executive functioning issues.

247Found this helpful
Dyscalculia: What You’re Seeing in Your Middle-Schooler

Middle-schoolers with dyscalculia may struggle with more than math. They could have a hard time making sense of maps and charts or doing things like making phone calls. Here’s what you might see.

Seems Afraid of Getting Lost
At home: Your child is hesitant to go places without you or to explore the neighborhood with
friends.
At school: Your child is anxious about moving from one classroom to another during the course of a regular school day.
The issue: Kids with dyscalculia might struggle with directions like left and right and with getting around in new places.
Avoids Everyday Use of Numbers
At home: Your child won’t make a phone call if it involves looking up the number.
At school: Your child tunes out during lessons that involve pie charts and graphs.
The issue: Kids with dyscalculia may have a difficult time remembering numbers and making sense of picture representations
of numbers.
Is Often Running Late
At home: Your child won’t wear a watch.
At school: Your child needs to walk with a friend to get to class on time.
The issue: Kids with dyscalculia often have trouble reading clocks and gauging increments of time.
Makes Vague Comparisons
At home: Your child seems lost when asked if the crowd at this week’s basketball game was bigger than last week’s.
At school: Your child has trouble with word problems that compare one group of items to another.
The issue: Kids with dyscalculia can have language processing issues that make it hard to master words like more, less, greater or fewer.
Graphic of Dyscalculia: What you're seeing in your middle-schooler
Graphic of Dyscalculia: What you're seeing in your middle-schooler

About the Author

Portrait of Amanda Morin

Amanda Morin

A parent advocate and former teacher, Amanda Morin is the proud mom of kids with learning and attention issues and the author of The Everything Parent’s Guide to Special Education.

More by this author

Reviewed by Sheldon H. Horowitz, Ed.D. Dec 03, 2013 Dec 03, 2013

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