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Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia: What You’re Seeing in Your Preschooler

By Amanda Morin

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Are you seeing typical childhood development in your preschooler—or early signs of dyscalculia? The following symptoms are often seen in kids with dyscalculia, but may also be seen in kids with dyslexia, dyspraxia or developmental delays.

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Dyscalculia: What You’re Seeing in Your Preschooler
Preschoolers with dyscalculia may have trouble with math skills like counting. But they could also have a hard time with sorting and categorizing. Here’s what you might see.

Doesn’t Connect Numbers to Groups of Things
At home: Your child doesn’t know which plate to bring you when you ask for the one with “four cookies” on it.
At school: Your child brings the teacher five building blocks—even though the teacher requested six.
The issue: Kids with dyscalculia often have trouble learning to associate a specific number to a
group of items.
Has Trouble Sorting Things
At home: Your child struggles to sort the silverware into spoons, knives and forks.
At school: Your child can’t group things by shape, size or color.
The issue: Kids with dyscalculia may have trouble sorting items in logical ways.
Can’t Recite the Emergency Procedures
At home: Your child can’t remember your phone number.
At school: Your child can’t remember that 911 is the number to call in an emergency.
The issue: Kids with dyscalculia often have a poor memory when it comes to numbers.
Is Always Asking “How Much Longer?”
At home: Your child says her sister has been watching TV forever even though the show has only been on for a few minutes.
At school: Your child wants to know soon after arriving at school why it’s not lunchtime already.
The issue: Kids with dyscalculia can have trouble accurately sensing time.
Graphic of Dyscalculia: What you're seeing in your preschooler
Graphic of Dyscalculia: What you're seeing in your preschooler

About the Author

Portrait of Amanda Morin

Amanda Morin

A parent advocate and former teacher, Amanda Morin is the proud mom of kids with learning and attention issues and the author of The Everything Parent’s Guide to Special Education.

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Reviewed by Sheldon H. Horowitz, Ed.D. Dec 03, 2013 Dec 03, 2013

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