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Self-control

At a Glance: 3 Types of Self-Control Issues

By The Understood Team

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Sitting still, waiting patiently and thinking things through are tough tasks for many kids. But for kids with self-control issues, weaknesses in those areas can make it hard to learn and make friends.

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At a Glance: 3 Types of Self-Control Issues

Self-control can affect everything your child does, from talking with a classmate to taking a test. Take a look at the different types of this important skill.

Impulse Control
What it means: The ability to stop and think before acting.
The key benefit: Allows kids to imagine the consequences of their behavior.
Without it kids may:
• Interrupt a lot, talk too much or speak out of turn
• Not get started on homework until close to bedtime
• Rush through assignments
• Follow rules one day but not the next

Emotional Control
What it means: The ability to manage feelings by thinking about goals.
The key benefit: Helps kids keep going even when upsetting or unexpected things happen.
Without it kids may:
• Become easily frustrated and quick to give up
• Be unable to tolerate corrections or criticism
• Fnd it difficult to calm down and do homework
• Have trouble postponing play until work is done
• Have trouble keeping their cool when someone annoys them

Movement Control
What it means: The ability to control body movements.
The key benefit: Lets kids regulate their physical actions and responses in an appropriate way.
Without it kids may:
• Be overly active or restless
• Have trouble with quiet or seated activities
• Have difficulty staying in line while waiting their turn
• Disrupt games and conversations with their movements
Graphic of At a glance: 3 types of self-control issues
Graphic of At a glance: 3 types of self-control issues

About the Author

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The Understood Team

The Understood team is composed of passionate writers, editors and community moderators, many of whom have children with learning and attention issues.

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Reviewed by Mark Griffin, Ph.D. Feb 05, 2014 Feb 05, 2014

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